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Student Testimonials

This past summer, I interned at GAP Inc.'s ecommerce department in Shanghai, China. It was a wonderful professional and cultural experience.

This past summer, I interned at GAP Inc.'s ecommerce department in Shanghai, China. It was a wonderful professional and cultural experience. My daily responsibilities included collaborating with different departments to design the weekly promotional plan, creating marketing material for customers in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, and conducting market research on major competitors' digital strategies. In addition, I got to connect with the CFO of Gap Inc. China, a Stanford alum who shared her experiences and advice about life after Stanford with me. After work and on the weekends, it was really fun to explore the Shanghai restaurants and nightlife with fellow Stanford interns. I also visited the surrounding cities of Shanghai and local art galleries with my co-workers.

One thing that surprised me was how much people in China are connected to their phones. I never use mobile payment apps in America, but this summer, I started using Wechat Pay and Alipay for everything. It seemed like everywhere I went, everyone was paying through their phones - even for online orders and subway vending machines. Even though it's only been 3 years since my last visit to China, coming back this year and seeing how quickly China has advanced was amazing. Overall, this summer experience made me realize that I'd like to work in China one day.

City: Shanghai
Company: Gap Inc., Greater China
Internship Year: 2016
Major: Undeclared

This program gave me the opportunity to step out of my comfort zone linguistically, personally and professionally.

This program gave me the opportunity to step out of my comfort zone linguistically, personally and professionally. Over the course of two months, I went from cautiously interacting with my host family with my two-quarters- worth of Portuguese two giving detailed flag-hanging protocol instructions to a group of native Brazilians all in Portuguese and relating arrival updates to my supervisor through a crackly walkie-talkie. Flexibility and improvisation were definitely required skills, especially when, for example, my supervisor showed up two hours late to work and we had no key to enter the office or when two hundred flags need to be raised and there are only 2 volunteers in the office. In each of these and many other cases, I learned to find a "jeitinho Brasileiro" and make things work (i.e. the Village mayor was found to let us in, and we were able to recruit volunteers from another area to help us out).  

The experience has certainly made me fall more in love with Portuguese and Brazilian culture. I am going to hopefully continue to maintain my Portuguese and look into what job opportunities may allow me to use it in the future. Working with the Olympics more generally has made me more excited to work in an organization that hires people from all around the world, because I really enjoyed the diverse and empathetic work environment an international organization creates.

City: Rio de Janeiro
Company: Rio 2016
Internship Year: 2016
Major: International Relations

Part of the reason I loved working for Fulbright was how varied the summer was, and the different aspects of the Fulbright teaching program I was involved with. It felt like a rollercoaster ride, high-stress days followed by low stress periods.

They include:

Part of the reason I loved working for Fulbright was how varied the summer was, and the different aspects of the Fulbright teaching program I was involved with. It felt like a rollercoaster ride, high-stress days followed by low stress periods.

They include:

-Working with the past years Fulbright English Teaching Grantees run the summer English camps across six middle schools in Taipei. This meant anything from taking photos of students, playing English one-on-one with students who had the most difficulty, running around with the students playing water dodgeball (all part of the lesson plan!).

-Arrival and orientation for new Fulbright English Teaching Grantees (about 70)

-Of course, office time, which included organizing files from the last 60 years by working with the Taiwanese interns and changing the layout of the Fulbright library and resource center.

It was my first time in Asia and Taiwan, but I can assure you, it won't be my last. I live to eat, and it felt everyone in Taipei felt the same way. I'm continually amazed at the plethora of food stalls, and made it my goal to eat everything I could. I'm counting on quinoa and kale on campus will put me back to shape.

There are few moments I believe I will remember forever, but this summer will undoubtedly be there. I can't truly describe how amazing this opportunity has been for me, and how grateful I am for the opportunity from the Global Studies. For the longest time, I thought that it was because of all the novel things I was experiencing and different problems that I faced, but it has been more that. This summer allowed me to understand myself more, something I haven't been quite able to do my first year of Stanford, where the support made it easy to not concentrate on much else but academics. In Taipei, I always take risks here in a way that I never had to back in school, and I feel that I grew because of that. I now have the confidence to not only apply my Chinese, but also in my decision-making.

City: Taipei
Company: Fulbright
Internship Year: 2016
Major: Undeclared

Three big projects dominated my time at IMANI Ghana, running me through the gauntlet of research, report writing, keynote presentation and interviews with major TV and Radio networks.

Three big projects dominated my time at IMANI Ghana, running me through the gauntlet of research, report writing, keynote presentation and interviews with major TV and Radio networks. The first of these was IMANI’s Fiscal Recklessness Index, a report detailing financial irregularities within public boards and ministries, or monies handled against protocol or federal law. I started the assignment assisting in data analysis, but ended up after 3 weeks on the project co-writing the full report and delivering the majority of the keynote presentation. This led to a write-up in the country’s largest newspaper and interviews in multiple TV and radio stations. In addition, I assisted with a major analysis on the feasibility of nearly 250 political promises made during the 2016 election season, eventually co-delivering the keynote presentation and getting my face on the front page of the country’s largest newspaper (a newspaper I currently have framed in my home). Finally, echoing my interest in Education, I assisted in data collection and report writing on a major education quality project, assessing the government’s progress on the Ministry of Education’s medium term strategic plan. In addition to these major projects, I also assisted in the development of the assessment framework for IMANI’s Public Service Leadership Awards (IPSLA), the assessment of the NDC’s social sector promises, and worked for a short while examining the process of port auctioning in Tema.  

Before going into my experience, I was reasonably certain I wouldn’t want to put down roots and live in Ghana long-term. The people I loved, work I wanted to do, and things I really wanted in life were all back in the US, and it would take a lot for me to move abroad permanently. This trip, while extremely influential and enjoyable for me personally, didn’t change that. It did, however, make me keenly aware of the political process, and how think tanks work day to day. It’s made me cognizant of how powerful the process of globalization has been, and how relevant it is to the policy process wherever one might live.  Though I still expect to work on policies at the state or regional level, I will make sure to keep in mind the international policies and political goings on that might affect policies stateside. To that end, I definitely hope to do more international travel, and perhaps take a few more international policy classes as well.

City: Accra
Company: IMANI
Internship Year: 2016
Major: Public Policy

It is one thing to know that people in developing countries live in complete poverty with a lack of access to so many basic resources such as electricity, clean water, and sometimes even food.

It is one thing to know that people in developing countries live in complete poverty with a lack of access to so many basic resources such as electricity, clean water, and sometimes even food.  It is completely different, however, to go live that life for 2 months, especially after growing up in a developed country with all these comforts and more for 20 years.  I learned a tremendous amount about the resilience and intelligence of people in these rural, developing regions, who despite their poverty work hard every day to educate themselves and better equip themselves with mechanisms to combat the hardships they face.

My specific work was for the water and sanitation team, however, outside of my particular project I took 2 work days to complete a solar panel install with members of the energy team at blueEnergy. I know nothing about electricity or electrical engineering, and this experience of working with other members of blueEnergy as well as interacting with the family members to install the solar panel and wire the house with 6 lightbulbs was incredibly educational, humbling, and rewarding.  Aside from this solar install, on the weekends we often traveled to other rural communities on the Caribbean coast of Nicaragua.  Although these trips did not include any work, it was really eye-opening to spend time in these communities, meet the local individuals, and experience their way of life for a few days.

I really feel that my resilience and perseverance have increased by working in this environment. Resilience and perseverance go hand in hand, and are uniquely related to me and my growth since my original project (greywater filtration system at the San Pedro School) proved un-achievable in my time frame due to the saturated soil and thus a new project (draining and drying out the schoolyard in preparation for a greywater filtration system) formed.  This also speaks to adaptability and problem solving as I learned how many times initial project ideas and deadlines may not be achievable, but nonetheless adjustments can be made and new goals can be set to achieve success and still make a difference.

City: Bluefields
Company: blueEnergy
Internship Year: 2016
Major: Earth Systems

I'd never been to Japan before and could not be more grateful that my first real exposure to the country was through my internship with igsZ, a joint venture education-finance company with a start-up feel.

I'd never been to Japan before and could not be more grateful that my first real exposure to the country was through my internship with igsZ, a joint venture education-finance company with a start-up feel. From the get-go I was entrusted with full responsibility of deliverables for several projects involving curriculum development. Yet I never felt abandoned. Everyone in the office welcomed me with open arms and provided me with a wealth of resources and knowledge—both within and beyond the office. One of the most memorable parts of my experience (and there were many!) was staying over at my manager's home in Kyoto while completing a workshop there. We prepared a home-cooked meal together and stayed up late into the night talking about differences across Japanese and Chinese kanji. 

I definitely believe that interning in Japan was the most authentic way for me to experience the country beyond the scope of taking Japanese classes at Stanford. In my downtime outside the office, I lived in my own apartment and spent the weekends exploring and connecting with the people I met in Japan—from playing card games in gaming haven Electric Town in Akihabara and visiting the Pokemon Center in Yokohama, to participating in a language exchange with students from the University of Tokyo and even climbing Mt. Fuji (overnight to see the sunrise) with my fellow intern. From exploring the corporate environment of Japan, to picking up samurai slang and swapping "hip vocab" with native Japanese speakers studying English—my summer with igsZ was a rich learning experience in myriad ways. So, to everyone I met in Japan, a big かたじけない! And because I hope to return again someday in the future: じゃ、またね Japan!

City: Tokyo
Company: igsZ
Internship Year: 2016
Major: Undeclared

Summer of 2015, I was given an indelible opportunity to work with the Asian International Justice Initiative through the Stanford Global Studies Internship Program in Cambodia.

Summer of 2015, I was given an indelible opportunity to work with the Asian International Justice Initiative through the Stanford Global Studies Internship Program in Cambodia. In Phnom Penh, I was able to meet and work with incredible people from around the globe as I learned about human rights from the Khmer Rouge tribunal. This experience was at times difficult and emotionally wrenching, but always valuable and worthwhile. Monitoring and reporting on the trial allowed me to feel like I was part of a significant moment in history, and inspired me to want to pursue human rights law in the future.

City: Phnom Penh, Cambodia
Company: WSD HANDA Center for Human Rights and International Justice, Asian International Justice Initiative (AIJI)
Internship Year: 2015
Major: Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

The major highlight of my summer was the people. I met people with whom I related to on so many levels; with whom I shared wonderful experiences and learned a lot from. I visited as much of Uganda as I could. I explored Ugandan cuisine; the matoke, the rolex, the nut soup, etc.

The major highlight of my summer was the people. I met people with whom I related to on so many levels; with whom I shared wonderful experiences and learned a lot from. I visited as much of Uganda as I could. I explored Ugandan cuisine; the matoke, the rolex, the nut soup, etc. Every last Friday of the month was "Fire Friday" at work: an end of month Party with amazing ambience and entertainment.

I chose Uganda on a whim. I told myself to go on explore the world. I have to admit my first three weeks in Uganda were hard. The cultural shock, the lack of immediate necessities like a refrigerator or internet left me frustrated. But I got to adapt to a different environment and sort of rid myself of my nagging and over privileged tendencies. Moreover, I met amazing people who have collectively left a lasting impact on me. It was truly fascinating. From work to the adventures I had with the other interns both form Uganda and abroad. Work taught me a lot about professionalism and the functioning of the workspace in an African setting. As I venture into the international business scene, this was a very imperative step. I'll be more assertive, proactive and think outside the box thanks to the lessons learned from Fireworks advertising company.

 

City: Kampala, Uganda
Company: Fireworks Advertising
Internship Year: 2015
Major: Management, Science & Engineering

I had the opportunity to intern at Ashoka in Dublin this summer. There, I helped design a new website for the non-profit, which was a great exercise in digital communication and specifically web interface design.

I had the opportunity to intern at Ashoka in Dublin this summer. There, I helped design a new website for the non-profit, which was a great exercise in digital communication and specifically web interface design. I also gained first-hand insights into the inner workings of non-profit administration - the dedication of everyone in our office to improve Irish education or environment-friendly farming practices as well as the difficulty in fundraising that non-profits are familiar with.

I have learned a lot about the non-profit sector this summer and hope to continue to gain even deeper experience in the future. Ireland was a beautiful country to be in and I'm grateful to have had the chance to travel during my internship and experience the wonderful music and literature of Ireland. Overall, it was a formative summer.

City: Dublin, Ireland
Company: Ashoka Ireland
Internship Year: 2015
Major: Comparative Literature, Economics

This summer, I was able to fulfill one of my lifelong dreams of working with an NGO in Uganda. The NGO I worked for is called Citizens' Coalition for Electoral Democracy in Uganda (CCEDU). The main goal of CCEDU is to promote and advocate for better governance in Uganda.

This summer, I was able to fulfill one of my lifelong dreams of working with an NGO in Uganda. The NGO I worked for is called Citizens' Coalition for Electoral Democracy in Uganda (CCEDU). The main goal of CCEDU is to promote and advocate for better governance in Uganda. In order to achieve their goal, CCEDU runs voter education programs, lobbies the government to pass electoral reforms, and observes various types of elections. During my internship, I was given a wide variety of tasks. I co-wrote a paper to lobby Parliament, attended many functions for their 2016 presidential election observation effort, and helped find a suitable advertising firm for their next voter education campaign. I also helped write the 2016 pre-election report, which was a 100 page document that outlined the problems that may be present during the 2016 elections. The most exciting task I completed was writing the research proposal for the first voter apathy study to ever be conducted in Uganda. I was really happy that CCEDU trusted me enough to take on the main responsibility for such an important project.

My internship with CCEDU was a fantastic experience. I learned far more about Uganda's government and electoral system than I could ever learn from a book. My co-workers (and all the other Ugandans I interacted with) helped me see their government in an entirely new light. Although there were many challenging aspects, such as a slow work pace and other cultural differences, I was able to grow from those experiences as well. I have always wanted to work with an NGO in Uganda, so I am unbelievably grateful that I was able to be a part of one (albeit for a short period of time). I enjoyed my internship enough to say that I would be willing to go back in the future. In fact, I may go back next summer to help carry out the field work for the voter apathy study. Overall, my internship with CCEDU helped me grow as a person and realize that I definitely want to pursue a career involving human rights and governance issues. 

City: Kampala, Uganda
Company: Citizens Coalition for Electoral Democracy, Foundation for Human Rights Initiative in Uganda
Internship Year: 2015
Major: Political Science, Psychology

I had an unforgettable professional and personal experience in Barcelona, Spain working as an online marketing and graphic design intern at a co-working space.

I had an unforgettable professional and personal experience in Barcelona, Spain working as an online marketing and graphic design intern at a co-working space. I spent 9 weeks working for a creative communication/design company called Immograf further developing my skills in online marketing, advertisement design, translation, and web design work in Spanish. 

One of the most important things I learned this summer is that I would like to strive to work in an environment with other young professionals from around the world. I was really inspired to be surrounded by a community of young, global, entrepreneurs and it was an eye opening experience as far as the types of career possibilities that are available to me outside the typical professional trajectory. 

City: Barcelona, Spain
Company: Internship Coworking Barcelona
Internship Year: 2015
Major: Undeclared

One of the many things that surprised me upon my arrival to Pune was the proximity of city's poverty stricken regions to its industrial hub.

One of the many things that surprised me upon my arrival to Pune was the proximity of city's poverty stricken regions to its industrial hub. On one side of the road is an imposing span of office buildings and factories that continues for miles, assembling everything from steam boilers to pressure gauges. On the other side, a mere few hundred metres away, a large collection of shanty houses lies in stark contrast to the nearby manufacturing facilities.

 

It is heartwarming to see that this disparity isn’t ignored by the companies in the area. In response to the lack of affordable healthcare available, my employer, Forbes Marshall, opened a fully equipped medical centre on it’s grounds open to anyone, where treatment will cost a patient only 2 Rupees (about 3 cents). 

In terms of office work, hours in India are longer, meetings are much more lively, and the food in the cafeteria is way more spicy! In Pune, the office floor is alive with the hum of chatter between co-workers - intermittently punctuated by a loud siren that signals the end of shift for the factory workers next door. 

Working in India has really opened my eyes to the cultural differences that exist in and out of the workplace from country to country.

City: Pune, India
Company: Forbes Marshall
Internship Year: 2015
Major: Undeclared

This summer in Japan was my first trip outside of the USA and it was truly an enlightening experience not only professionally but also culturally.

This summer in Japan was my first trip outside of the USA and it was truly an enlightening experience not only professionally but also culturally. As a professional it taught me the importance of communicating in teams in order to advance through projects faster, especially when you don’t have much experience, and the importance of company relations (esp. the senpai kouhai relations which are most likely far more than what I will ever need in America). However, the most important thing Japan taught me was the fact that regardless of culture and location most people just want to meet others who can add value to their life, be it through knowledge or having fun, a revelation that has deeply changed my outlook of the world and makes me want to explore the world now.

City: Tokyo, Japan
Company: Mitsubishi Research Institute
Internship Year: 2015
Major: Economics

I came into the Department of Sports medicine knowing little about sports, sports injuries, and even thought I was quite the expert at weightlifting. That all changed very quickly.

I came into the Department of Sports medicine knowing little about sports, sports injuries, and even thought I was quite the expert at weightlifting. That all changed very quickly. In a short two months, I witnessed live orthopedic surgery, helped with mouse surgery, participated in isokinetic experiments, trained with professional golfers using vibration equipment, visited Olympic training facilities, learned about athletic taping and how to utilize it, explored the vibrant scene of Taiwanese community health, and most personally for me, I unlearned all my weightlifting techniques and learned again from scratch.

These two months have been a humbling experience, teaching me not only an enormous amount of technical material in regards to sports injuries and community health but also an important skill -- the ability to be wrong, a readiness let go of what I thought I knew and whole-heartily receive information, stories, and experiences. I now feel Taiwan is very much a part of me. 

City: Taichung, Taiwan
Company: China Medical University
Internship Year: 2015
Major: Undeclared

This summer, professionally, I got the chance to learn a tremendous amount about the digital marketing and technology landscape in China, both sparking new interest and deepening existing ones.

This summer, professionally, I got the chance to learn a tremendous amount about the digital marketing and technology landscape in China, both sparking new interest and deepening existing ones. I was also able to develop my research skills and learn more about consulting, both of which will bode well in my future career plans. On a more personal level, this opportunity has truly helped me grow. In navigating the ups and downs of working in a country I've never set foot in before and completely immersing myself in a Chinese-speaking environment, I was able to really stretch myself beyond my comfort zone and develop new perspectives along the way. These experiences will be cherished as one of the best in my life.

City: Beijing, China
Company: Samsung OpenTide Consulting
Internship Year: 2014
Major: Economics

Participating in the Global Leadership Program at blueEnergy Nicaragua this summer was a great opportunity for me to grow academically and personally.

Participating in the Global Leadership Program at blueEnergy Nicaragua this summer was a great opportunity for me to grow academically and personally.

My project was to create and analyze a market study of ecostoves in urban neighborhoods in Bluefields, Nicaragua. In Bluefields, the majority of families use open fire charcoal stoves that release smoke that is harmful to the family’s health and the environment. My role in addressing this complicated issue was to understand the social and technical aspects of cookstoves in this area so that blueEnergy can provide families with the models of ecostoves that are best suited for the communities they are working in. In this process, I conducted and analyzed about 80 surveys of Nicaraguan families in Bluefields to understand their current cooking behavior, health, and economic situation and characterize their interest and willingness to pay for the ecostoves. The skills I learned such as need-finding, designing and implementing surveys, cross-cultural communication, statistical analysis, and market analysis, will be useful as I continue to seek and contribute to projects with impact across the world.

The internship also offered me opportunities to venture out of my comfort zone and grow through new experiences and reflections. Whether I was learning about ecostoves and solar energy, spontaneously participating in soccer and meringue dancing, or exploring the communities in the area, my experiences this summer were academically, culturally, and personally enriching.

City: Bluefields, Nicaragua
Company: blueEnergy
Internship Year: 2014
Major: Undeclared

This was opportunity to stretch myself-- to break out of my comfort zone and build not only my technical capabilities as an economics student, but also my abilities to adapt and to observe.

This was opportunity to stretch myself-- to break out of my comfort zone and build not only my technical capabilities as an economics student, but also my abilities to adapt and to observe. Spending this past summer in Pune, India working for Forbes Marshall has re-ignited my passion for the challenges and rewards that come from living and working abroad, and re-affirmed my desire to do so after graduation (as well as before). The economics research I carried out for Forbes Marshall on a number of international markets increased my knowledge of those markets, but more importantly, it increased my understanding of how economics can be applied in a "real world" setting-- which makes all the difference in motivating me in my studies. At the same time, I got to flex my creative muscles with some design and marketing work. As an economics student with a passion for social justice and international development, working for a company (as opposed to an NGO, as I have done in the past) in India, and more generally, reaffirmed my belief that "social good" has many forms, and comes from many sources. Forbes Marshall is a company that has a firm focus on community, and a wide variety of CSR programs. I am passionate about the intersection between business and social good, and this summer gave me the opportunity to see the relationship between the two in action. I have built skills and passions that I will use throughout my life.

City: Pune, India
Company: Forbes Marshall
Internship Year: 2014
Major: Economics

I was working in an all-Japanese corporate environment with a group of designers from whom I learned, who helped me grow both personally and in the industry, and with whom I was able to experience Japan. My project was developing a next-generation automotive concept cockpit design.

I was working in an all-Japanese corporate environment with a group of designers from whom I learned, who helped me grow both personally and in the industry, and with whom I was able to experience Japan. My project was developing a next-generation automotive concept cockpit design. I focused on designing an interface and physical mechanism. At the end of the summer, I presented my designs in Japanese to the design center and executive team.

Additionally, I was able to travel and explore the beautiful and bustling city. I bought an unlimited pass for a famous dance studio in Shibuya, where I took classes from world-renowned choreographers that I have admired for years. I explored National Gardens, Tokyo Disneyland, took meditation and tea ceremony classes.

It was very honestly a transformative experience, and established a connection with Japan for me that I know will stay with me for the rest of my life.

City: Ofuna, Japan
Company: Mitsubishi Electric Co.
Internship Year: 2014
Major: Product Design

I spent two months in Seoul, South Korea working with the Publications and Public Relations team at the Asia-Pacific Centre of Education for International Understanding.

I spent two months in Seoul, South Korea working with the Publications and Public Relations team at the Asia-Pacific Centre of Education for International Understanding. There, I was able to explore the work behind an international organization and further reinforce my experience with my major in International Relations. My work dealt mostly with proofreading news articles and interviews to be published in the organization’s magazine, SangSaeng, as well as the organization’s website and social media. However, I was able to write some of my own short articles as well as offer some input in creative decisions. Overall, what struck me the most was the hospitality and friendliness of the staff and interns on my team. I was able to form camaraderie with many of them despite our cultural differences. Although there were times in which I felt like an outsider, my co-workers treated me with patience and understanding.

My favorite parts about this past summer, however, involved learning how to live in and adapt to Korea. Although this wasn’t my first time there, I was able to experience the country in a new, extensive way. From the daily commute on the subway to budgeting for weekly groceries, I felt somewhat immersed into the society. My weekend excursions and adventures also allowed me to meet new people, see new sights, eat delicious food, and explore Korea on my own terms.

City: Seoul, South Korea
Company: Asia-Pacific Centre of Education for International Understanding under the auspices of UNESCO
Internship Year: 2014
Major: International Relations

During my eight weeks in Rio de Janeiro, I worked on two fascinating projects in the D’Or Institute.

During my eight weeks in Rio de Janeiro, I worked on two fascinating projects in the D’Or Institute.

I first became involved in a research project called EmoCode, investigating the link between music and emotion. We all experience emotions while listening to music, but are these music-evoked emotions analogs of naturally occurring emotions? For example, I can listen to a sad piece of music, perceive that the music itself is conveying sad emotions, but actually be feeling a pleasure response to an enjoyed stimulus. Using fMRI and EEG, the project hopes to map the neural correlates of various music-evoked emotions and compare them to known regions of activation associated with the corresponding natural emotions. My work on this project has laid a great foundation for my planned project with the Honors in the Arts program this coming year.

Unexpectedly, I was also introduced to a neuropsychologist who works with psychopathy at the D’Or Institute. He had just begun working with a patient who was reportedly “cured” of psychopathy after surviving a gunshot to the head. This rare case of salutary changes following frontal lobe damage gave us the opportunity to explore regions of the frontal cortex related to pro-social behaviors. I helped interview the patient and write up a case report, which should be published soon. After this case, I have cultivated an interest in neuropsychology, and am thinking about pursuing it in medical school. 

My experience was incredibly enriching both culturally and intellectually. I have fallen in love with Brazilian music and the soft sounds of sung Portuguese. I also met some of the warmest, kindest people I have ever known. My trip has inspired me to search for more opportunities to return to Brazil and continue studying Portuguese. 

City: Rio, Brazil
Company: Rede D'Or Institute
Internship Year: 2014
Major: Human Biology

I had never been to China until this summer, when I got to live and work at a magazine in Beijing. I had studied Chinese but had only really scratched the surface in my study of Chinese culture.

I had never been to China until this summer, when I got to live and work at a magazine in Beijing. I had studied Chinese but had only really scratched the surface in my study of Chinese culture. During the summer I lived with a native Beijing host family and they taught me more about Chinese culture than I could ever learn in a classroom, and improved my Chinese, to boot. They took me to eat Peking duck, to the park they went to on Saturday mornings to sing and dance, and even to a Chinese wedding. The showed me more generosity and hospitality than I ever could have asked for! I also learned about Chinese culture through my work. I interned at Time Out Beijing and was lucky enough to get to explore the city for my job.  The magazine covers what's what in Beijing--music, nightlife, food, activities around town and more. I interned in the editorial department and worked with the web editor and performed a variety of tasks: editing event posts, writing blogs, doing research and transcriptions and writing articles for the magazine. I got to explore Beijing's hutongs, go to a fashion party, attend art exhibits, and go rock climbing with a view of the Great Wall--and all for my job!  I loved getting to know the city, and also getting to experience working at a magazine. Journalism is something that I've been interested in since before high school and interning at Time Out was the culmination of time on my high school's yearbook staff and communication classes at Stanford. My summer working at Time Out was a truly incredible experience!"

City: Beijing, China
Company: Time Out Magazine
Internship Year: 2013
Major: International Relations

Stepping out of the terminal at Incheon International Airport, I thought I knew what to expect; my previous summer at Yonsei University had been a whirlwind of sightseeing and Kpop concerts.

Stepping out of the terminal at Incheon International Airport, I thought I knew what to expect; my previous summer at Yonsei University had been a whirlwind of sightseeing and Kpop concerts. After only three days at Arirang News, I realized that the next two months would be unrecognizably different. Finally, and quite suddenly, I was experiencing the authentic aspects of living and working in Seoul. On our first Friday night, my fellow Stanford intern and I found ourselves sitting at a booth in a chicken and beer restaurant for the company’s annual party. The President and CEO gave speeches in Korean, and with help from my new friends, I understood the messages of teamwork and diligence. Over the next few weeks, I watched the news team put those values into action, as production crews, reporters, anchors, and techies construct both daily programs and special TV documentaries. As with any work experience, I learned quickly how to address my superiors and organize my schedule to meet deadlines. Our tasks included transcribing interviews and writing reports on everything from a UN Inquiry into North Korean human rights abuses, to the business models used by leading entertainment companies. In addition, we had the chance to explore Arirang’s other departments like Radio and Television. Not only was this a great opportunity to understand more about the nature of the Korean work environment, it also taught me so much about the coordination involved in running big companies. I hope to use my experience in the future when working with businesses throughout East Asia.

City: Seoul, South Korea
Company: Arirang TV
Internship Year: 2013
Major: Undeclared

My experience in Shanghai was one of the most valuable experiences in all aspects from working in China to living alone.  I always thought that learning about work and technical things came second to learning the people and culture. My stay in Shanghai once again confirmed that.

My experience in Shanghai was one of the most valuable experiences in all aspects from working in China to living alone.  I always thought that learning about work and technical things came second to learning the people and culture. My stay in Shanghai once again confirmed that. I enjoyed most talking to people (mostly my co-workers) who had come from totally different backgrounds and therefore those who had a very different train of thought. Rather than judging, we freely talked and discussed our thoughts and beliefs. We began to understand each other. Even outside of work, the people I met were those I would never have met if I had not come to this city and I enjoyed getting to know them in very different settings than at work. I learned about the city through the people and valued it even more because of the people I met.  I felt that going to Shanghai and interacting with my co-workers and the interns was a new world. I began to understand that there are things about the IT industry and localization patterns that I had not known. Rather than asking, "This seems useless, how is this practical?" or "Who would use this, we already have things that are better out there", I started to say "There may be a different target for this that I don't understand, let's learn about it" or "That doesn't really make sense but do people here need it because of some reason?"  I came back with an appreciation for a city that I only had idealistic thoughts about and am actually ready to go back if I have a chance. I thank my co-workers for making my stay so comfortable and my parents who supported my decision in all ways.  Till next time, bye Shanghai, hello home.

City: Shanghai, China
Company: Lenovo
Internship Year: 2013
Major: Science, Technology and Society

This past summer, I hopped on a plane and landed in Taiwan. Away from family and friends for the first time, I had the opportunity to really nurture a sense of independence and identity.

This past summer, I hopped on a plane and landed in Taiwan. Away from family and friends for the first time, I had the opportunity to really nurture a sense of independence and identity. From learning to navigate the extensive transportation network of buses, trains, and subways that threaded the small island country together to witnessing my first typhoon, these novel experiences allowed me to view the world from a new angle. Exchange student researcher by day and a tourist by night, the double life enabled me to experience the country through a unique lens. Interning as a researcher at Asia University was a more diverse experience than I had anticipated: I harvested rice, extracted plant DNA, and visited a technology exhibition. I especially enjoyed being able to apply my skills and coursework to a new set of problems. After the work-day was over, I switched the lab coat for a cardigan and stepped into the world of night markets, fifteen story malls, and themed restaurants. In Taiwan, my taste buds enjoyed an assortment of delightfully delectable treats that included: freshly grilled oysters and clams, stinky tofu, mango shaved ice, matcha ice cream, pineapple cakes, taro cakes, and every flavor of tea imaginable. In addition to exploring the local city of Taichung, where I was interning, my adventures also took me to beautiful hiking paths, historical streets, the celebrated Taipei 101, the picturesque Sun Moon lake, as well as an assortment of beaches. As I boarded the plane, homebound, I realized that in a just a few short weeks, my time abroad had vastly broadened my perspective of the world: I had an address book filled with new friends, a camera full of memories, and a summer filled with fresh insights and unforgettable experiences.

City: Taichung, Taiwan
Company: Asia University
Internship Year: 2013
Major: Bioengineering

I had an incredible experience working and living in Tokyo this summer. As the only foreigner in the 200-person Global Energy Systems Integration Unit at NEC, I felt immersed in a traditionally Japanese yet forward-thinking business culture.

I had an incredible experience working and living in Tokyo this summer. As the only foreigner in the 200-person Global Energy Systems Integration Unit at NEC, I felt immersed in a traditionally Japanese yet forward-thinking business culture. Although I was not well-versed in the smart grid and electrical systems when I began my internship, I was treated as a full member of the team: I worked the same hours as my colleagues, attended important meetings and business trips to other NEC branches, and gave regular presentations reporting on my progress. I learned about the structure of Japanese businesses as well as the operation of large multinational corporations, knowledge that may be useful in working from the United States or internationally in my eventual career. Additionally, my colleagues were very welcoming and offered to show me many aspects of Japanese culture. With them, I visited traditional temples and modern cultural neighborhoods in Tokyo, ate delicious food, traveled to Kyoto by bullet train, and climbed Mt. Fuji. My stay in Japan was a pleasant balance between the autonomy of a adult traveler and member of the workforce and the excitement of being shown around a new landscape by the locals. By the end of my internship, I learned that leaving my familiar environment for an entirely foreign one, while not easy, is a rewarding challenge that opens doors both now and in coming years.

City: Tokyo, Japan
Company: NEC
Internship Year: 2013
Major: Undeclared

Before my internship with Arirang Television began, I tried to keep myself from forming expectations about Korea. This effort may have been pointless, however, for the Korea I experienced this past summer was something that surpassed any expectations I could have formed.

Before my internship with Arirang Television began, I tried to keep myself from forming expectations about Korea. This effort may have been pointless, however, for the Korea I experienced this past summer was something that surpassed any expectations I could have formed. I climbed mountains, I helped backstage at concerts, I ate still-wriggling octopus, and I formally greeted celebrities in Korean.

My internship at Arirang Television was with a production team working on a show about traditional Korean music.  While the television station broadcasts in English, most of the production team was more comfortable talking to me in Korean, despite my limited knowledge of Korean. Soon I found myself picking up both production terms and common small-talk vocabulary. The experience was immersive not only language-wise but friendship-wise. The work was highly collaborative; there were two other interns on my show’s team and we were assigned work collectively. These interns were Korean, but had attended school in the United States. Spending over 40 hours a week speaking about our show and our lives in a strange yet comfortable mix of Korean and English tied us together in a way little else could.

We had shared interests that had brought us all to the same internship and we were able to help each other experience Seoul in new ways. These friendships are invaluable to me. My internship experience has convinced me that I would like to return to work in Korea and my friendships formed this summer created a family of sorts to whom I can return.

City: Seoul, South Korea
Company: Arirang TV
Internship Year: 2012
Major: East Asian Language and Culture

I was able to intern in Shanghai this summer and benefitted from a memorable summer and work experience. Living and learning about Shanghai was a rare opportunity.

I was able to intern in Shanghai this summer and benefitted from a memorable summer and work experience. Living and learning about Shanghai was a rare opportunity. Although I had briefly visited Shanghai a few years ago, I discovered this summer how much the city had transformed within just half a decade. Shanghai has evolved into a first-class international city, and yet, the city still radiates a unique Chinese cultural and historical flair—one that has intrigued and engaged foreigners and locals for over a century.

I worked as a summer intern associate at InterChina Consulting in the Mergers & Acquisitions advisory group and the firm was very welcoming from day one. Their bicultural background and value-added emphasis contributes to a dynamic corporate culture. InterChina’s expertise is in multiple industries and I was exposed to conducting business in China as well as the intricate and rigorous atmosphere of M&A. From drafting project proposals to sector research, I was able to deepen my knowledge on topics of interest while honing my business skills. My supervisors provided me with many opportunities, such as including me on important meetings and conferences; I was even able to attend a trip to Shanxi for fieldwork, due diligence, and face-to-face interviews! Official office work was conducted in English, while fieldwork and due diligence was often in Chinese, thus providing an ideal balance for me. Everyday, my co-workers and I would have lunch together where the discussions would range from China’s economic climate to current Chinese pop culture, allowing for interesting conversations along with great company and food.

This unique summer experience has significantly molded my perspective of business in China as well as providing me with a better sense of corporate business. Furthermore, working in Shanghai and at InterChina Consulting has definitely confirmed my desire to work in China in the future. 

City: Shanghai, China
Company: InterChina Consulting
Internship Year: 2012
Major: History

I had an amazing time working as a research assistant in the Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital Research Lab in Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

I had an amazing time working as a research assistant in the Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital Research Lab in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. My principal investigator and coworkers were more than willing to guide me through each step of the research process. The lessons that I learned will prove to be invaluable in my future medical career. My experience this summer gave me a greater sense of independence, knowledge about a new country, and more interest in research.

I would not be doing justice to my experience if I did not mention the wonderful food and people. There is no better way to appreciate Taiwanese culture than to go to a night market and sample all the exceptionally inexpensive and delicious food possible (especially stinky tofu!). In addition, the hospitality and kindness shown by the Taiwanese people are unparalleled. The slightly cliché tourist slogan is “Taiwan, Touch Your Heart,” but by the end of my trip, I realized that this tiny island had deeply touched mine.

City: Kaohsiung, Taiwan
Company: Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital
Internship Year: 2012
Major: Biology

I interned at the Tokyo office of Morrison & Foerster LLP, a law firm that deals with international corporate deals such as cross-border M&A deals and patent litigations, mainly representing stereotypical large Japanese conglomerates in their dealings in the United States.

I interned at the Tokyo office of Morrison & Foerster LLP, a law firm that deals with international corporate deals such as cross-border M&A deals and patent litigations, mainly representing stereotypical large Japanese conglomerates in their dealings in the United States. Having grown from the small foreign office founded by the now legendary Ken Siegel in the ‘80s to the largest foreign law firm in Japan, and having an office in a posh high-rise building next to Tokyo Station and the Imperial Palace, Morrison Foerster is the American law firm in Japan. Although my status as the only “clueless” undergraduate intern in an environment full of seasoned legal professionals and law students ensured that a not-insignificant part of my work would consist of doing what everybody else told me to do, I was able to work on a number of interesting cases, such as a pending merger involving Japanese and American telecommunications firms, and a case involving patent enforcement for a Japanese firm in the United States.

More importantly, I had the opportunity to sample what life and the corporate culture are like at the Tokyo office of a western firm. Even if I do not decide on a career in law, it seems highly likely that I will work in such an environment in the future, and thus all in all, I found the experience of interning at Morrison & Foerster a rewarding privilege.

City: Tokyo, Japan
Company: Morrison & Foerster LLP
Internship Year: 2012
Major: Undeclared